As part of cognitive behavioral therapy, receiving text messages can make people feel less isolated. Research by Adrian Aguilera, a social welfare professor at the University of California, Berkeley, has found an upside to texting, especially for people who feel stressed out, isolated, and alone.

“When I was in a difficult situation and I received a message, I felt much better. I felt cared for and supported. My mood even improved,” reported one Spanish-speaking patient in Aguilera’s cognitive behavior therapy group at San Francisco General Hospital.

The project began in 2010 when Aguilera developed a customized “Short Message Service (SMS)” intervention program in which his patients were sent automated text messages prompting them to think and reply about their moods and responses to positive and negative daily interactions.

(Source: futurity.org)